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The Cover of Wonder Woman #38 is A Bloody Mess

dcwomenkickingass:

Half of Wonder Woman’s team, Meredith the writer, was chatting up the new book at NYCC including this interview from VOX:

"David did not intend to say that she’s not a feminist," she said, explaining that Wonder Woman, like feminism, has evolved since the character was created. Finch says…

WTF?

C/W

Seriously, this picture needs a Content Warning

spookyspookospook:

Whither thou goest, I will go

Whither thou lodgest, I will lodge

Thy people shall be my people

love this movie so much.

the book is even better

(via mumblingtruth)

pplm:

When thinking about Halloween costumes this year - make sure to dress up as something or someone that will not trivialize someone else’s identity!

I’m usually a witch. And on Halloween I dress up.

pplm:

When thinking about Halloween costumes this year - make sure to dress up as something or someone that will not trivialize someone else’s identity!

I’m usually a witch. And on Halloween I dress up.

(via feminspire)

laughterkey:

land-of-propaganda:

3 years in Rikers Island, 2 in solitary confinement, this high school student, NEVER CHARGED, gets released

16-year-old high school sophomore Kalief Browder, of the Bronx, spent nearly three years locked up at the Rikers Jail after he says he was falsely accused of stealing a backpack.  Amazingly, Browder never pleaded guilty, actually refused to plead guilty and requested a trial, even when pressured, but was never convicted and was only offered plea deals while the trial was repeatedly delayed.

Near the end of his time in jail, the judge “offered” to sentence him to time served if a guilty plea was entered, and warned him he could face 15 years in prison if convicted, but Browder still refused to accept the deal.  The only reason Browder was finally released was because his case was dismissed, but the damage had been done.

Browder, a high school student, spent an unbelievable 800 days, or over 2 years, in solitary confinement, which is a common juvenile imprisonment practice that the New York Department of Corrections has now banned after several investigations.

How does a teen end up in jail for 3 years, of which 2 years was spent in solitary confinement, and never be charged with a crime?

Browder’s case highlights several broken mechanisms in the New York legal system that feeds itself to civil liberty abuses on our youth.

  1. The 6th amendment gives us a right to a speedy trial, but in New York they have a “Ready Rule”.  The “Ready Rule” allows the courts to postpone trial dates by offering continuances. The system may give a continuance for 1 week, but logistically it may be 1 month before the trial actually comes to fruition and the still not convicted civilian only gets “credit” for the 1 week, not the actual time they have served.  In Browder’s case, he was given an absolutely ridiculous number of continuances initiated by the prosecution which left him locked up because he could not afford the $3000 bail.
  2. Browder was a high school student and juveniles are supposed to continue their education while behind bars .. except for juveniles that are in solitary confinement.  Guards would place juveniles in solitary and the schooling would stop relinquishing any educational support.
  3. While in solitary, Browder says that guards would routinely refuse to give him his meals.  Hunger is a common complaint by teens that are locked up because of the 12-hour stretch between dinner and breakfast.  Guards would use starve tactics at their discretion for punishment or their own personal enjoyment.  Browder says the worst of his starvations lasted for 4 meals in a row, meaning he was denied breakfast, lunch, dinner and another breakfast.
  4. As it stands, the courts place people in these situations and it is human nature for some to strike a plea deal just to get out of jail.  But Browder did not play into their game and take a plea deal, but maintained his innocence and requested a trial which came at a snail’s pace. This leads one to believe that the courts use this a planned tactic or procedure to play on human nature all in the name of getting convictions.
  5. The issues of using a Public Defender have long been recorded across the country.  In New York, court appointed lawyers make $75 a case.  In order to make money, that PD has to take on huge caseloads which leads to other problems.  Browder, although locked up for nearly three years in Rikers, where his PD was located everyday, never once was visited by his PD or had anyone to advocate his case for him.  This shows a reckless disregard which leads to a vicious cycle of apathy that often leads innocent people to copping pleas or getting longer sentences.

Read more here

He was charged, but never convicted. Per the newyorker:

The next day, he was led into a courtroom, where he learned that he had been charged with robbery, grand larceny, and assault. 

Not trying to imply that in any way makes this better. It’s horrifying from top to bottom.

This should never happen

(via neil-gaiman)

Happy Anniversary harrypotteralliance :) Thank you for all you do!
I have been happy to be a member of Dumbledore’s Army for a few years.This is my daughter and I in ~2009/10 at a library event.

Happy Anniversary harrypotteralliance :) Thank you for all you do!

I have been happy to be a member of Dumbledore’s Army for a few years.This is my daughter and I in ~2009/10 at a library event.

alwaysjkrowling:

thehpalliance:

Today is our ninth birthday. We were founded in 2005 with one simple goal: to turn fans into heroes. For nine years, your support has made that dream a reality. 
We like to use our birthday as a chance to reflect on the past years and today we ask you to join us in doing so by reblogging this post and sharing how being a part of the HPA has helped validate your experience as a fan. 
We’ll share some of our favorites throughout the day and some of them might even be shared on air during our birthday party tonight at 8 pm ET.
Thank you for a magical nine years. 

Happy Anniversary HPA! One of the most magical things that has come from the world that Jo Rowling created! The Weapon We Have Is Love! <3

Love the Harry Potter Alliance!

alwaysjkrowling:

thehpalliance:

Today is our ninth birthday. We were founded in 2005 with one simple goal: to turn fans into heroes. For nine years, your support has made that dream a reality. 

We like to use our birthday as a chance to reflect on the past years and today we ask you to join us in doing so by reblogging this post and sharing how being a part of the HPA has helped validate your experience as a fan. 

We’ll share some of our favorites throughout the day and some of them might even be shared on air during our birthday party tonight at 8 pm ET.

Thank you for a magical nine years. 

Happy Anniversary HPA! One of the most magical things that has come from the world that Jo Rowling created! The Weapon We Have Is Love! <3

Love the Harry Potter Alliance!

Today is World Day Against the Death Penalty. #NoDeathPenalty

via Amnesty International

"The death penalty is the ultimate violation of our human rights - cruel, inhumane, disproportionately used against minorities, and irreversible."

Congratulations to two amazing people who dedicate their lives to children and education. #Malala #Satyarthi #NobelPeacePrize

(via BBC News - Malala Yousafzai and Kailash Satyarthi win Nobel Peace Prize)

Congratulations to two amazing people who dedicate their lives to children and education. #Malala #Satyarthi #NobelPeacePrize

(via BBC News - Malala Yousafzai and Kailash Satyarthi win Nobel Peace Prize)

An Open Letter to John Green

jasonrivest:

Dear John Green,

I write this in response to your Vlogbrothers video on september 30th. As you can probably tell, I am sort of a chronic procrastinator. This letter has been in the back of my mind for about a week now. I figure if I want it to have a chance of still being relevant, I have to…

Yes, fully agree!

DFTBA!

Virginia is for ALL Lovers!

thinksquad:

The much-anticipated U.N. Climate Summit, which began today in New York, is ostensibly a platform for world leaders to leap frog debates over whether climate change is real, and skip straight to discussions centered around how to overcome the challenges it poses. But it’s also an impetus for those beyond the sessions’ panels to illuminate troubling patterns of behavior that are contributing to our collective carbon footprint—and food waste is without question one of the most egregious, especially in the United States.

In 2012, the most recent year for which estimates are available, Americans threw out roughly 35 million tons of food, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. That’s almost 20 percent more food than the United States tossed out in 2000, 50 percent more than in 1990, and nearly three times what Americans discarded in 1960, when the country threw out a now seemingly paltry 12.2 million tons.

In 1980, food waste accounted for less than 10 percent of total waste; today, it makes up well over a fifth of the country’s garbage. Americans, as it is, now throw out more food than plastic, paper, metal, or glass—and by a long shot.

Roughly a third of the food produced worldwide never gets eaten. The problem is particularly egregious in developed countries, where food is seen as being more expendable than it is elsewhere. “Every year, consumers in rich countries waste almost as much food (222 million tonnes) as the entire net food production of sub-Saharan Africa (230 million tonnes),” the U.N. notes on its website.

This country is one of the worst offenders: a 2012 paper by the Natural Resources Defense Council estimated that as much as 40 percent of America’s food supply ends up in a dumpster.

The most obvious problem with this waste is that while Americans are throwing out their food, an estimated one in every nine people in the world still suffers from chronic hunger—that is, insufficient food—including more than 200 million in Sub-Saharan Africa and more than 500 million Asia. Even in the United States, where that number is significantly lower, some 14 percent of U.S. households still struggled to put food on the table for a portion of last year, according to the USDA.

The level of food waste suggests that curbing hunger isn’t a matter of producing more food so much as better preserving and distributing the food currently being produced. As the United Nations noted in its report on world hunger last week, there is actually enough food to feed all seven billion people living in the world today.

But there’s another less apparent problem with food waste: the threat to the environment. Landfills full of decomposing food release methane, which is said to be at least 20 times more lethal a greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. And America’s landfills are full of food—organic waste is the second largest contributor to the country’s landfills. Those same landfills are the single largest producer of methane emissions in the United States—they produce almost a quarter of the country’s total methane emissions, according to the NRDC.

The environmental cost of food waste goes further than just methane emissions. Producing food is a costly affair for the environment—an estimated one third of global carbon emissions come from agriculture—but it’s one society pays to feed itself.

The price for producing food that never ends up in someone’s mouth is much more—it includes both the resources and environmental decay sacrificed for its making. The livestock industry contributes more than 15 percent of global carbon emissions, according to the U.N, which means that when Americans throw out meat, they are wasting some of the most environmentally costly food available.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2014/09/23/americans-throw-out-more-food-than-plastic-paper-metal-or-glass/?tid=sm_fb

"Women have sat indoors all these millions of years, so that by this time the very walls are permeated by their creative force, which has, indeed, so overcharged the capacity of bricks and mortar that it must needs to harness itself to pens and brushes and business and politics."

Virginia Woolf, “A Room of One’s Own” (via marinashutup)

(via thesecretbooksociety)

vintagegal:

The Munsters Paper Dolls, 1966

(via mostlysignssomeportents)

I knew my resume was incomplete…

wishuponastardis:

Special skills: extensive Harry Potter knowledge, can watch an entire TV show in a week, knows words to every Disney song, can form abnormally strong attachments to fictional characters, Microsoft Word

(via englishmajorhumor)

Cutest baby animal thing on the interwebs