Latest Tweets:

my porn

(Source: , via readbeforeyouwrite)

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bookshop:

sdi-darkmatter:

Fuck the lannisters

#oakoak #street art

bookshop:

sdi-darkmatter:

Fuck the lannisters

#oakoak #street art

usnatarchivesexhibits:

Richard Nixon’s Dogs King Timahoe, Vicky, and Pasha Sit in a Row and Peer Out of a White House Window, 12/01/1970
Item from White House Photo Office Collection (Nixon Administration). (01/20/1969 - 12/1974)
Today is National Pet Day. Our pets leave a mark on our lives, no matter if they belong to average citizens or presidents. In honor of National Pet Day, here are the First Dogs from the Nixon Administration: King Timahoe, Vicky and Pasha.
Source: http://go.usa.gov/Dku3 

usnatarchivesexhibits:

Richard Nixon’s Dogs King Timahoe, Vicky, and Pasha Sit in a Row and Peer Out of a White House Window, 12/01/1970

Item from White House Photo Office Collection (Nixon Administration). (01/20/1969 - 12/1974)

Today is National Pet Day. Our pets leave a mark on our lives, no matter if they belong to average citizens or presidents. In honor of National Pet Day, here are the First Dogs from the Nixon Administration: King Timahoe, Vicky and Pasha.

Source: http://go.usa.gov/Dku3 

(via npr)

(Source: jessicavalenti)

tortallmagic:

Olaf as some of the Disney Princesses!!!!!!

best mashup ever

(via eloisesweet16)

*2

I envision Judy greeting Mickey on the other side, singing this to him with a wink, and them dancing off into the stars.
He was a true Hollywood star, since infancy until his golden days. And he worked with EVERYONE, but I will always remember watching his musicals with Judy Garland.
Rest in Peace, Mr. Rooney. Thanks for the memories.


(via http://www.youtube.com/attribution_link?a=bhrTNZqQApQ&u=/watch?v=HdzGdNf8H4k&feature=share)

lauriehalseanderson:

vvidget:

I know this is long, but I needed to share it.

Amen.

thelovenotebook:

everything love

thelovenotebook:

everything love

(via a-thousand-words)

wilwheaton:

jean-luc-gohard:

afternoonsnoozebutton:

katespencer:

I find it very disheartening that the news coverage of this James Franco story is that he “flirted” and “chatted” with this 17-year-old girl instead of calling him out for what it really is: being a predator. He very clearly tried to have sex with her and was well aware of her age. This is is not, as he called it, “a model of how social media is tricky,” and the media not calling him out his inappropriate behavior is really giving me all the rage today. 

He literally asked if he could book a hotel room for them. What the hell does the media think he wanted to do in said hotel room, bat his eyelashes and play footsie? 

Motherfucker wasn’t tryna take her to the damn sock hop and then to the diner for malts.

Go fuck yourself, Franco. You disgust me.

wilwheaton:

jean-luc-gohard:

afternoonsnoozebutton:

katespencer:

I find it very disheartening that the news coverage of this James Franco story is that he “flirted” and “chatted” with this 17-year-old girl instead of calling him out for what it really is: being a predator. He very clearly tried to have sex with her and was well aware of her age. This is is not, as he called it, “a model of how social media is tricky,” and the media not calling him out his inappropriate behavior is really giving me all the rage today. 

He literally asked if he could book a hotel room for them. What the hell does the media think he wanted to do in said hotel room, bat his eyelashes and play footsie? 

Motherfucker wasn’t tryna take her to the damn sock hop and then to the diner for malts.

Go fuck yourself, Franco. You disgust me.

*33
mediamattersforamerica:

Happy Friday from the chyron writers at Fox News! 

#ReverseReagan ??
That sounds painful.

mediamattersforamerica:

Happy Friday from the chyron writers at Fox News! 

#ReverseReagan ??

That sounds painful.

theatlantic:

This Man Took 445 Photobooth Portraits of Himself Over 30 Years, and Nobody Knows Why

For three decades, starting in the 1930s, he did the same thing. He’d sit inside a photo booth. He’d smile. He’d pose. 
And then—pop! pop! pop!—out would pop a glossy self-portrait, in shades of black and white. There he was, staring back at himself … and grinning. And, sometimes, almost scowling. There he was, mirthful. And, sometimes, almost scornful.  
The man—nobody knows who he was—repeated this process 455 times, at least, and he did so well into the 1960s. Nobody knows for sure why he did it. Or where he did it. All we know is that he took nearly 500 self-portraits over the course of thirty years, at a time when taking self-portraits was significantly more difficult than it is today, creating a striking record of the passage of time. 
The man’s effort is now being shared with the public in the form of a collection being shown at Rutgers’ Zimmerli Art Museum in New Brunswick. “445 Portraits of a Man,” the exhibit is appropriately called, takes these early, earnest selfies and presents them as art. 
Read more. [Image courtesy Donald Lokuta]

theatlantic:

This Man Took 445 Photobooth Portraits of Himself Over 30 Years, and Nobody Knows Why

For three decades, starting in the 1930s, he did the same thing. He’d sit inside a photo booth. He’d smile. He’d pose. 

And then—pop! pop! pop!—out would pop a glossy self-portrait, in shades of black and white. There he was, staring back at himself … and grinning. And, sometimes, almost scowling. There he was, mirthful. And, sometimes, almost scornful.  

The man—nobody knows who he was—repeated this process 455 times, at least, and he did so well into the 1960s. Nobody knows for sure why he did it. Or where he did it. All we know is that he took nearly 500 self-portraits over the course of thirty years, at a time when taking self-portraits was significantly more difficult than it is today, creating a striking record of the passage of time. 

The man’s effort is now being shared with the public in the form of a collection being shown at Rutgers’ Zimmerli Art Museum in New Brunswick. “445 Portraits of a Man,” the exhibit is appropriately called, takes these early, earnest selfies and presents them as art.

Read more. [Image courtesy Donald Lokuta]

faultinourstarsmovie:

One note = one vote. Like or reblog to vote for your state! Go your-state-name-here!

I will reblog all the ways

faultinourstarsmovie:

One note = one vote. Like or reblog to vote for your state! Go your-state-name-here!

I will reblog all the ways

nprfreshair:

"The stock market is rigged," Michael Lewis tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. “It's rigged for the benefit for really a handful of insiders. It's rigged to … maximize the take of Wall Street, of banks, the exchanges and the high-frequency traders at the expense of ordinary investors.”
Lewis is the author of several books about the stock market, including Liar’s Poker and The Big Short. His new book Flash Boys is about the form of computerized transactions known as High Frequency Trading, in which the fastest computers with the most high speed connections get the information first, and make the trade before anyone else can. A nanosecond can make all the difference between how much money is made or lost on any transaction.
Brad Katsuyama (above) figured out how the system is rigged and set out to change it. Lewis explains:

"There is this perception that Wall Street insiders understand how Wall Street works — and it’s false. It’s especially false right now. Here you have this young man, this kid [Katsuyama] at the Royal Bank of Canada who’s engaged in this kind of science experiment in the market. He figures out at least one angle the predators are taking and he goes and talks to not just ordinary investors … the biggest investors, the smartest investors in the world and their jaws are on the floor. … Even these people have no idea what’s going on in the market and are being educated by this Canadian who has basically just arrived on the scene and has decided to make understanding [this] his business."

Photo of President and CEO of IEX Group Brad Katsuyama by Philip Montgomery for The Wall Street Journal

nprfreshair:

"The stock market is rigged," Michael Lewis tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. “It's rigged for the benefit for really a handful of insiders. It's rigged to … maximize the take of Wall Street, of banks, the exchanges and the high-frequency traders at the expense of ordinary investors.”

Lewis is the author of several books about the stock market, including Liar’s Poker and The Big Short. His new book Flash Boys is about the form of computerized transactions known as High Frequency Trading, in which the fastest computers with the most high speed connections get the information first, and make the trade before anyone else can. A nanosecond can make all the difference between how much money is made or lost on any transaction.

Brad Katsuyama (above) figured out how the system is rigged and set out to change it. Lewis explains:

"There is this perception that Wall Street insiders understand how Wall Street works — and it’s false. It’s especially false right now. Here you have this young man, this kid [Katsuyama] at the Royal Bank of Canada who’s engaged in this kind of science experiment in the market. He figures out at least one angle the predators are taking and he goes and talks to not just ordinary investors … the biggest investors, the smartest investors in the world and their jaws are on the floor. … Even these people have no idea what’s going on in the market and are being educated by this Canadian who has basically just arrived on the scene and has decided to make understanding [this] his business."

Photo of President and CEO of IEX Group Brad Katsuyama by Philip Montgomery for The Wall Street Journal

(Source: pinterest.com)